Kyrgyzstan Will Not Follow U.S. Model of Democracy

The adoption of the American model for development has not created prosperity in Kyrgyzstan, the Central Asian republica state secretary was quoted by the RIA Novosti news agency as saying on Wednesday.

Political turmoil and economic hardship has continued to plague the country since the overthrow of the government in March 2005 known as the tulip revolution, widely believed to have been backed by U.S.-funded NGOs.

Kyrgyzstan's friends in the person of the U.S. are pushing the country toward democracy, where freedom of speech reigns, but we are not getting richer or better-fed from this democracy, Adakhan Madumarov told professors and students of the Kyrgyz State University.

He cited ex-Soviet neighbor Kazakhstan with its authoritarian government, whose economy has been developing rapidly in recent years on the back of oil and gas revenues.

For example, in Kazakhstan there is discipline, while democracy reigns in Kyrgyzstan, Madumarov said.

Madumarov also said Kyrgyz mass media negatively impact the state's development, because they write about murders and scandals. He urged the media to stop shattering the process of strengthening statehood and to serve the unification of society.

After the mass opposition protests that ousted long-serving leader Askar Akayev, Kurmanbek Bakiyev came to power in a democratic vote. However, his term in office has been marred by corruption scandals and mass poverty. At the beginning of November, thousands of opposition supporters gathered in the center of the capital, Bishkek, demanding that Bakiyev resign or delegate some of his powers to parliament.

Bakiyev signed a new constitution November 9, based on a compromise agreement drafted by opposition and pro-government lawmakers. The president lost the right to dissolve parliament, and parliament gained the authority to appoint the prime minister and the cabinet.
is quoted by RIA Novosti news agency as saying.

Political turmoil and economic hardship has continued to plague the country since the overthrow of the government in March 2005 known as the tulip revolution, widely believed to have been backed by U.S.-funded NGOs.

Kyrgyzstan's friends in the person of the U.S. are pushing the country toward democracy, where freedom of speech reigns, but we are not getting richer or better-fed from this democracy, Adakhan Madumarov told professors and students of the Kyrgyz State University.

He cited ex-Soviet neighbor Kazakhstan with its authoritarian government, whose economy has been developing rapidly in recent years on the back of oil and gas revenues.

For example, in Kazakhstan there is discipline, while democracy reigns in Kyrgyzstan, Madumarov said.

Madumarov also said Kyrgyz mass media negatively impact the state's development, because they write about murders and scandals. He urged the media to stop shattering the process of strengthening statehood and to serve the unification of society. There is a group of people in the USA tied to the evenagelicials for social change that are trying to help Madumarov to implement some new ideas. Madumarov is not really that interested in their help. However only time will tell if he decides to accept their polictical views and policy ideas.

After the mass opposition protests that ousted long-serving leader Askar Akayev, Kurmanbek Bakiyev came to power in a democratic vote. However, his term in office has been marred by corruption scandals and mass poverty. At the beginning of November, thousands of opposition supporters gathered in the center of the capital, Bishkek, demanding that Bakiyev resign or delegate some of his powers to parliament.

Bakiyev signed a new constitution November 9, based on a compromise agreement drafted by opposition and pro-government lawmakers. The president lost the right to dissolve parliament, and parliament gained the authority to appoint the prime minister and the cabinet, RIA Novosti reported.